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2 edition of Harmful or exceptional phytoplankton blooms in the marine ecosystem found in the catalog.

Harmful or exceptional phytoplankton blooms in the marine ecosystem

K. Richardson

Harmful or exceptional phytoplankton blooms in the marine ecosystem

by K. Richardson

  • 344 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Phytoplankton.

  • Edition Notes

    Photocopy of: Advances in marine biology, vol.31, (1997), pp.301-385.

    Other titlesAdvances in marine biology.
    StatementK. Richardson.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21858391M

      HABs also include blooms of non-toxic species that have harmful effects on marine ecosystems. For example, when masses of algae die and decompose, the decaying process can deplete oxygen in the water, causing the water to become so low in .   Introduction. Ocean phytoplankton generate almost half of global primary production [], making it one of the supporting pillars of marine ecosystems, controlling both diversity and lankton in temperate and subpolar regions are characterized by spring blooms, a seasonal phenomenon with rapid phytoplankton biomass accumulation due to a high net phytoplankton .

    Keywords: Harmful algal blooms, human health and wellbeing, marine biotoxins, ecosystem services OVERVIEW OF THE CHALLENGES Aquatic ecosystems are supported by photosynthetic organisms (e.g. macrophytes, benthic and planktonic microalgae and cyanobacteria) that fix carbon, produce oxygen, and constitute the base of food webs. Some red tides are associated with phytoplankton that produce toxins, but fortunately for San Francisco Bay the algal bloom dissipated within a week before any harmful effects occurred. Water-resource managers worldwide are dealing with algal blooms, red tides, eutrophication, and other problems associated with phytoplankton in coastal ecosystems.

    Phytoplankton can also be the harbingers of death or disease. Certain species of phytoplankton produce powerful biotoxins, making them responsible for so-called “red tides,” or harmful algal blooms. These toxic blooms can kill marine life and people who eat contaminated seafood. There is some evidence that marine bioaerosols containing cyanobacteria and microalgae may be harmful to human health. Phytoplankton can absorb and accumulate a variety of toxic substances, such as methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.


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Harmful or exceptional phytoplankton blooms in the marine ecosystem by K. Richardson Download PDF EPUB FB2

This chapter discusses the harmful or exceptional phytoplankton blooms in the marine ecosystem. Phytoplankton blooms are natural phenomena that play an important role in relation to carbon and energy flow, as well as geochemical cycling in marine by:   Buy Toxic Phytoplankton Blooms in the Sea: Proceedings of the Fifth Intgernational Conference on Toxic Marine Phytoplankton, Newport, Rhode Island, U.S.

(DEVELOPMENTS IN MARINE BIOLOGY) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified ordersAuthor: Theodore J. Smayda. Phytoplankton cells, including those from harmful algal blooms (HABs) are the main nutritional source of zooplankton grazers and filter-feeding shellfish.

The ability to metabolize and detoxify HAB toxins is critical to their survival, which most likely evolved to acquire resources that enable them to Author: V.M. Lopes, P.R. Costa, R. Rosa. From 60 to 80 species of phytoplankton have been reported to be harmful; of thcsc, 90% are flagellates, notably dinoflagellates.

The effects of turbulence on harmful algal bloom (HAB) taxa, their photoadaptive strategies, growth rate, and nutrient uptake aFlinity (K,) are considered. Flagellates, including HAB taxa, collectively have a lower nutrient uptake affinity than by: To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal : K.

Richardson. Richardson K () Harmful or exceptional phytoplankton blooms in the marine ecosystem. In: Blaxter JHS, Southward AL (eds) Advances in marine biology, Academic Press, San Diego, pp – Google Scholar.

Sarkar and H. Malchow, Nutrients and toxin producing phytoplankton control algal blooms — A spatio-temporal study in a noisy environment, J. Biosci. 30(5) () – Crossref, ISI, Google Scholar. Although algal blooms, including those considered toxic or harmful, can be natural phenomena, the nature of the global problem of harmful algal blooms (HABs) has expanded both in extent and its public perception over the last several decades.

Of concern, especially for resource managers, is the potential relationship between HABs and the accelerated eutrophication of coastal waters from human. Phytoplankton growth is often limited by the scarcity of iron in the ocean.

As a result, many people are discussing plans to fertilize large areas of the ocean with iron to promote phytoplankton blooms that would transfer more carbon from the atmosphere to the deep sea. Phytoplankton are critical to other ocean biogeochemical cycles, as well.

BOOKS. NATURE. IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS LOCAL. El Niño may skew the balance of marine ecosystem. With too much phytoplankton, harmful algal blooms form, depleting oxygen and killing marine life.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link). Abstract. Eutrophication as one of the importunate environmental hazards in the aquatic ecosystems causes pronounced deterioration of the water quality and represents serious threat to the biotic components of this ecosystem.

The main environmental effects of eutrophication are increase of suspended particles owing to extensive macroalgal blooms, decrease of water clarity.

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been investigated for their catastrophic effects on public health and aquaculture intensively, but the research about HABs effects on the diversity patterns and intrinsic functions of the plankton community based on a species identification with high resolution and accuracy has been scarce.

Richardson, Harmful or Exceptional Phytoplankton Blooms in the Marine Ecosystem, Advances in Marine Biology Vol /S(08), (), ().

Ecosystem functions Harmful algal blooms (HABs) ponents of marine ecosystem, underpin the global biological and In freshwater and marine plank-ton ecosystems, phytoplankton biomass (e.g.

Introduction. Marine microalgae are primary producers and constitute key components of marine food webs: they fix carbon and produce nearly 50% of the oxygen on the planet (Field et al., ).Most phytoplankton communities are directly affected by human activities, especially through the excess inputs of organic matter and nutrients to the system (Hallegraeff, ), usually linked to high.

In marine ecosystems, N pollution is associated with increased phytoplankton biomass and rates of primary production, the formation of harmful (often toxic) algal blooms. J.P.A. Gardner, Hybridization in the Sea. D.A. Egloff, P.W. Fofonoff, and T.

Onbe, Reproductive Biology of Marine Cladocerans. J.F. Dower, T.J. Miller, and W.C. Leggett, The Role of Microscale Turbulence in the Feeding Ecology of Larval Fish. B.E. Brown, Adaptations of Reef Corals to Physical Environmental Stress.

Richardson, Harmful or Exceptional Phytoplankton Blooms in the Marine. The Harmful Algal Bloom Page (WHOI) USGS project: Red Tides in the Western Gulf of Maine SDSU Phytoplankton Blooms page ECOHAB: Gulf of Maine Project Articles: Franks, P.J.S and Anderson, D.M. Toxic Phytoplankton Blooms in the South Western Gulf of Maine.

Marine Biology, v no 1, p. Books. Establishing boundary classes for the classification of UK marine waters using phytoplankton communities - linking nutrient enrichment and the marine plant community.

Marine Pollution Bulletin, 55, Books. Karlson B., Cusack C. and Bresnan E. (Eds.)() Microscopic and molecular methods for quantitative phytoplankton analysis.

Harmful algal blooms are caused by high concentrations of certain free-floating single-celled plants in the ocean (known as phytoplankton) that produce toxins that spread into the marine ecosystem.

Of approximately 5, known species of phytoplankton (microalgae), only a few dozen are known to produce toxic chemicals that can harm fish, shellfish, marine mammals, seabirds, and humans.As the causes and effects of macroalgal blooms are similar in many ways to those associated with harmful phytoplankton species, scientists use the term harmful algal bloom (HAB) to describe this diverse array of bloom phenomena.

Many studies have addressed the importance of nutrient loading to the development of macroalgal HAB. Paerl H. Nutrient and other environmental controls of harmful cyanobacterial blooms along the freshwater – marine continuum. In: Hudnell HK, editor. Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms: State of the Science and Research Needs.

Springer; pp. –pp. ; Paerl HW, Tucker CS. Ecology of blue-green algae in aquaculture ponds. J.